A Scientific Rationale for Mobility in Planetary by National Research Council Staff PDF

By National Research Council Staff

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44. S. , “Earth-Based Observations of the Galileo Probe Entry Site,” Science 272: 839, 1997. 45. W. , “Near Infrared Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere of Jupiter,” EOS, Transactions, American Geophysical Union, 78: 413, 1997. 46. K. , “Chemistry and Clouds of the Atmosphere of Jupiter: A Galileo Perspective,” in Three Galileos: The Man, the Spacecraft, the Telescope, J. , Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, the Netherlands, 1997. 47. H. B. Pollack, and A. Seiff, “Galileo Doppler Measurements of the Deep Zonal Winds at Jupiter,” Science 272: 842, 1996.

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